Quiz: Make a Healthy Plate

Quizzes are great vehicles for teaching key health lessons and making sure they stick. Today, as a special treat, I’d like to share one of the quizzes from the PowerPoint show Make a Healthy Plate. This show is one of the chapters in the 12 More Lessons of Wellness and Weight Loss program, which is a comprehensive employee weight loss program.

Are you ready for the sneak peek?

Which Plate?

All right, here’s the quiz. Take a look at the slide above. Which plate has the most calories? Is it Plate A, with a chicken fried steak and fries, or is it Plate B, the one filled with a chicken and vegetable stir fry alongside some brown rice?

Answer Slide

You may not be surprised to see that it’s Plate A that has the most calories, but look at how many more calories it has than Plate B. Plate A has 1,121 calories, while Plate B has only 356 calories. That’s a 765 calorie difference!

A closer look at Plate A

Let’s take a closer look at each plate. You get the calorie total in Plate A by combining an 8-ounce fried steak — which has 521 calories — with 6 ounces worth of French fries. That serving has 600 calories, which brings the total up to 1,121 calories. The fat content is nothing to sneeze at either. When the 21 grams of fat in the steak join the 33 fat grams in the fries, they add up to 54 total grams of fat on that plate alone!

Plate B

Now let’s do the same math for Plate B. A single cup of carrots and a cup of broccoli each have 54 calories. The chicken breast has another 140 calories, and the brown rice has 108 calories. When you add all that up, you get 356 calories for the plate. And the fat grams are much smaller as well. Each cup of vegetables has less than 1 gram of fat, and the brown rice has none at all. The chicken breast has 3 grams of fat, which brings the fat total for the whole plate to roughly 4 grams of fat.

That’s where I’m going to end the slide preview for today. This excerpt comes from pretty early in the Healthy Plate PowerPoint. The show goes on to cover the basics of MyPlate, the components of each My Plate food group, strategies for eyeballing the correct portions, ways to calculate the total calories on your plate, and even methods for “shrinking your plate” at each meal. Fun pop quizzes pepper the presentation, which ends with a review of its most important points.

And that’s just 1 chapter of the 12 that are featured in the 12 More Lessons of Wellness and Weight Loss program! I wasn’t kidding when I said that it was comprehensive. Check out the details for the 12 lessons in the link below…

Here’s a PDF copy of all the slides you saw today — feel free to use the quiz however you’d like!

Healthy Plate

And here are some other great resources from the Nutrition Education Store!

Finding Success on the Path to Wellness

Have I mentioned that I just updated all of our comprehensive wellness programs?

Because I have, and I’m really proud of what my team and I have created. The latest updates include information from the 2015-2020 edition of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, along with a streamlined presentation platform and general improvements that will make these resources more fun for your audience.

So to celebrate that excitement, I’m sharing some slides from one of the most popular programs, The 12 Lessons of Wellness. Today’s preview comes from the show Getting Started, and the slides I’ve chosen offer advice for staying motivated and sidestepping pitfalls on the path to good health.

Let’s take a closer look!

FaceChallenges

As you embark on any path to wellness, you’ll eventually encounter a few stumbling blocks. That’s totally normal! If you plan ahead, it will be easier to overcome those obstacles and continue on your road to success.

Make sure to have a plan B for when the going gets a bit tougher. Fill your freezer with healthy meals. Prep healthy snacks and store them in the fridge or pantry. Keep some in the car in case an on-the-go craving strikes. Speaking of putting things in the car, toss a few exercise clothes in the trunk so that you’re always prepared for a workout. This will help you avoid skipping workouts because you didn’t plan ahead, and it will also ensure that you are prepared if an unexpected exercise opportunity pops up.

Remember that reaching and maintain a healthy weight is your lifetime plan. When you feel discouraged, focus on your successes and review your reasons for wanting to lose weight in the first place.

SpecialOccasions

Now let’s delve into some detail. How can you stay motivated during special occasions?

One tip is to eat before the party so that you aren’t starving when you face down a festive and lavish spread. While you’re there, focus on the conversation. If you do want to indulge a bit, keep things small, exercise the next day, and eat lighter for the rest of the day or the day after.

At these parties, you may encounter a weight loss saboteur or two. Avoid people who don’t support your efforts and instead find people who share your goals. Who knows? This may be a great opportunity to get a workout buddy!

SlowProgress

Let’s move on to another challenge. What happens when you hit a period of slow/no progress?

To start, have patience with yourself. Some days are easier than others. Revisit your goals and make sure that they’re realistic. You can always talk with your dietitian or doctor about your frustration too — they’ll have lots of great ideas for you.

RewardWhen it comes to keeping your motivation through health and fitness challenges, sometimes a reward is just the boost you need. Establish what your reward will be ahead of time, and remember, the reward shouldn’t be food!

It’s often helpful to set up rewards for milestones, not just the final goal. Plan a few rewards that you can earn along your path to fitness and weight loss — don’t just save one big reward for the end!

The show goes on in much more detail, but that’s where I’d like to stop the sample for today.

If you like what you see, consider exploring the 12 Lessons of Wellness and Weight Loss program. It’s one of the most comprehensive and effective programs for employee weight loss that my team and I have created, and it has been hugely popular.

And, as a special bonus, here are the free printable PDFs of the slides we previewed today!

Getting Started Sample Slides

And here are some of the top-selling weight loss resources from the Nutrition Education Store!

7 Simple Ways to Save Calories

Reward Chart Handout

Feel Full with Fewer Calories PowerPoint and Handout Set

Wellness Fair Success: The Story of a Banner

Want to hear a story?

Change It Up Health Fair BannerThis one is all about wellness fairs, health education, weight management, and custom posters. Intrigued? I thought so.

It all started with Kisha Bowden, a supervisor at the Parker Hannifin Corporation. Parker Hannifin is having a wellness fair for all its employees in order to kick off a weight-loss contest, and Kisha needed some banners to pep up her booth.

After an in-depth look at the Nutrition Education Store and some soul searching, Kisha chose the following banners on banner stands…

Once those were ordered, Kisha changed her focus to accessories and prizes. The 10K Steps wristbands offered a daily reminder and compelling message, so Kisha added them to her cart.

10,000 Steps WristbandsThat would be a great story of wellness fair decorations and balance, but it doesn’t stop there, because the next thing Kisha did was get inspired.

Since the wellness fair promotes a weight loss contest that runs from now to June, Kisha decided to have us create a custom banner for her employees, adding their names and offering inspiration that was designed to fit their needs. I loved her idea, so my team and I started in on possible designs right away.

We were on fire! From the time that Kisha emailed me to the time the order was set up and processed, less than one whole day had passed. We worked together to create a brand-new poster for her team, and Kisha liked it so much that she ordered custom bracelets too! All of these amazing treats will be on their way to Kisha soon, arriving only 6 days after she first visited the store.

Poster: Stand Up For YouI love projects like these! It makes me so happy to be able to make your jobs easier and to create exciting new resources that promote health and wellness. If you’d like a customized poster or bracelet set of your very own, all you need to do is ask! We are here when you want to look your very best right now.

And, in the meantime, I want to remind you about all the free resources my team and I have created for health educators. Here is a rundown of a few of my favorites — which ones are most useful to you?

Plus, we are always creating new products and resources. If you have anything you’d especially like to see, just let me know!

And here are some other wellness fair resources, perfect for health fairs, presentations, and more!

Fruit and Vegetable Banner and Stand

Wellness Fair Kit

Fruit and Vegetable Pens

Restaurant Problems

My weight loss and healthy eating class continues. Recent discussions involved restaurants and how in-the-world can you eat healthful out.

Here is some wisdom from the trenches on this topic:

• Don’t go!

• Always eat something either before you go or before your entrée: a salad or celery sticks but something.

• Share. Give part of it to someone else.

• Choose grilled.

• Ask for substitutions. Ask for extra vegetable or vegetables to replace fries, cole slaw or chips.

• Ask for a doggie-bag immediately.

The “doggie-bag” idea was their #1 recommendation. Cut your entrée in half and put it in the take-out box before you eat anything. This really cuts the portion sizes (you’ll be amazed at how much food you have  once you get it home) and also allows you to enjoy this meal a second (or possibly third) time.  If you wait until you’re done eating or just estimate when to stop eating  you end up nibbling away and eat more than you intended.

Their first response “don’t go” may seem extreme but may be the smartest of them all.

Eating away from home—be it fast food breakfast or lunch, a quick pizza on a Friday night or that fancy date on Saturday—has become a way-of-life for many people. I’m showing my age again, but, I remember when eating out was a special event for birthdays or holidays. Now it’s estimated at half of all adults eat at least one meal out every day. That’s a lot of food…and I won’t even talk about the effect this can have on the food budget.

Restaurant meals tend to be larger and higher in calories, fat, saturated fat and sodium than we need. Also, it’s hard to get fruits and vegetables in restaurant meals (French fries don’t count!). Low-fat or non-fat dairy products are almost nonexistent at restaurants. While some fast food restaurants are now offering these items in their kids’ meals, the price of little bags of carrots or apples just astounds me.

Planning can also be the key when eating out. If you’re planning a social night out at a restaurant, adjust your eating the rest of the day to allow for the uncertainty of restaurant meals. Don’t skip meals, but eat healthfully. You don’t want to be starved when you get to the restaurant. Also, can you get a copy of the menu before—this can allow you to plan. If it’s available, look up the nutrition analysis of the menu items. This will help you make good choices.

I’m not saying to never ever eat out again. But, even the most dedicated healthful eater can have problems in restaurants. You have much more control when eating at home. Maybe the idea is to eat out less, pack your lunch more often and plan ahead a little.

Cheryle Jones Syracuse, MS

Professor Emeritus, The Ohio State Univerisity

 

Baffle the Buffet

A large chain all-you-can-eat buffet opened a couple years ago in our community. Since this is a small town with limited restaurant choices, it has become very popular. It also has a meeting room where local clubs and groups meet. Sometimes “not going there” is not the option.

So the challenge…can you go to a buffet and not over-do?

Here are a few suggestions from members of my weight loss and healthy eating class:

• Check it all out first and decide what you really want. Decide which calories are “worth it.”

• Start with the salad and fresh vegetable section—fill a plate with these. Watch the dressing.

• Look for fruit—canned peaches and fruit cocktail in syrup doesn’t count.

• Look for grilled items.

• Do they have steamed items? Maybe peel-and-eat shrimp?

• Skip things with sauces, high fat cheeses and gravy.

It’s OK to take just a little. Sit down. Eat slowly. Then get a clean plate and get something else. Remember MyPlate. Every time you get something fill at least half your plate with fruits and vegetables.

If you want dessert, go for just one item. Select the one you really want, don’t nibble on several.  Chocolate fountains may actually be a blessing.  These fountains usually offer fruit and angel food cake as dippers—both good choices—-even with a little chocolate.

Members of my class are very assertive. They told the manager when they weren’t satisfied with the choices. If you’re not finding appropriate choices tell the management or fill out any evaluations. You’re probably not the only one who is having trouble.

Cheryle Jones Syracuse, MS

Professor Emeritus, The Ohio State University

 

Hungry Mouth

I’ve been teaching an on-going healthy eating and weight loss class.  A couple weeks ago I got an email from one of the students.  She said, “I’m trying to be mindful of what I eat, but I’ve concluded that a major problem of mine is having a hungry mouth, even though I have a happily full tummy.”

She wondered if others have the same problem and asked for possible solutions to the hungry mouth.

I proposed her topic to my class.  Many agreed that wanting to put something in their mouth when they really weren’t hungry is always a challenge.  I’m guessing that there are folks everywhere with this problem and especially now with all the weigh-loss resolutions that it’s a hurdle for many.

My class offered these ideas to overcome this obstacle. They might work for you or your class members.

  • Duct tape—this was a real answer—they were only half joking.
  •  Challenge yourself to wait for a time to eat.  If it’s 2:15 p.m. challenge yourself to wait until 3 p.m. until you eat something (think: a fruit or a yogurt).  Chances are you’ll get involved with a project or activity and  3 p.m. will pass and you’ll forget you were hungry. If not, get yourself a healthy snack.
  • Brush your teeth.  Sometimes just the sweet taste of the toothpaste is all you need in your mouth.  Or if it’s nighttime  maybe you won’t eat again because you don’t want to brush your teeth again.
  • Distract yourself for 20 minutes.  This might be time to fit in that walk.
  • Don’t sabotage yourself by watching the cooking channel, reading food magazines or looking at food catalogs (even the fruit catalogs have very branched out to add sugary mouth-watering goodies.
  • Don’t have tempting foods in the house.
  • Buy really good chocolate and allow yourself one piece a day.  This satisfies the sweet tooth. 
  • Drink a big glass of water.  If you’re craving sweets add some sweet flavoring to the water.
  • Put the snack bags away.  Out-of-sight out-of-mind. Make your own “snack packs” and limit yourself to so many a day or week.
  • If you want a dessert in a restaurant get one “for the table”. That way you get a taste but don’t have the temptation to eat the whole thing.

None of these are foolproof, but could give that little edge you need against that “hungry mouth”.

Cheryle Jones Syracuse, MS

Professor Emeritus, The Ohio State University

Weight Loss Pre Post Test

Weight Loss Pre/Post Test

  1. A healthy weight can help reduce the risk of developing or help control:
    a.  heart disease
    b. type 2 diabetes
    c. breathing problems
    d. some types of cancer
    e. all of the above
    f. I don’t know

2. BMI is a measure of weight in relationship to height, and stands for:
a. Biological Metric Integration
b. Basal Metabolic Index
c. Body Mass Index
d. I don’t know

3. You should be evaluated by your physician before starting a weight loss program if:
a. you have any health problems
b. you take any medication
c. you want to lose more than 15-20 pounds
e. you plan to follow a liquid diet that replaces all food for at least 1 month
f. all the above
g. I don’t know

4. A healthy weight loss plan:
a. recommends eating <1000 calories per day
b. contains a list of foods that you should never eat
c. promises quick results
d. incorporates gradual changes in food choices that last for a lifetime
e. I don’t know

5. The most effective weight loss plans:
a. recommend both increased physical activity and changes in food choices
b. focus only on changing food habits
c. require 2-3 hours of exercise each day
d. use supplements to promote weight loss
e. I don’t know

6. The most effective meal schedule for weight loss is:
a. skipping breakfast
b. avoiding all snacks
c. eating regularly scheduled meals and snacks throughout the day
d. consuming only meat and vegetables for dinner
e. I don’t know

7. The best way to lose weight and keep it off is to:
a. consume 500-1000 fewer calories each day
b. eat less carbohydrate and more protein
c. eliminate sugar
d. follow a gluten-free diet
e. I don’t know

8. To monitor weight loss progress,  weigh yourself:
a. every time you eat
b. monthly
c. every morning
d. weekly
e. never
f. I don’t know

9. Which habit helps promote fullness after eating as well as weight loss?
a. eating slowly, taking at least 15-20 minutes to complete a meal
b. eating fruit only for breakfast
c. avoiding whole grains
d. using a juicer for all vegetables
e. I don’t know

10. In order to lose weight, you should:
a. never eat high-fat, high-sugar treats like candy or ice cream
b. eat only sugar-free versions of sweets
c. eat only fat-free versions of sweets
d. eat smaller amounts of sweets less often
e. I don’t know

11. A recommended and safe rate of weight loss is:
a. 5 pounds per week
b. 1-2 pounds per week
c. 3-5 pounds per week
d. I don’t know

By Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE.

Resources:

National Weight Control Registry. http://www.nwcr.ws/Research/default.htm

Aim for a Healthy Weight. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/lose_wt/index.htm

Download Word File With Answers Now: Weight Loss Pre and post test

For more weight loss education materials and programs, click here.