What Are Vitamins?

There are 13 different vitamins, and they’re vital micronutrients. You can divide them into two groups: fat-soluble and water-soluble.

Vitamins A, D, E and K are all fat-soluble. They require fat to be absorbed, and they are stored for a long time in your liver and body fat.

The rest are water-soluble vitamins, which travel more readily through the bloodstream. You pee out the ones that you don’t use quickly.

Vitamins are necessary for every function in your body. Your heart needs them to beat, your lungs need them in order to expand and contract, etc. If specific vitamins aren’t present in large enough quantities, these vital functions are adversely affected or even stop.

Think of your body as a house that needs constant, ongoing maintenance. The walls, foundation, and roof of the house are the macronutrients that provide the structure. Vitamins are the individual nails that hold everything together, the grout that keeps the floor tiles in place, and the paint that protects the walls. When you run out of nails, the house falls apart. When the grout crumbles and isn’t repaired, the floor tiles separate, and when paint chips and flakes, the walls are more likely to decay.

When your body runs out of a specific vitamin, it can’t function correctly. For example, vitamin C plays a vital role in maintaining the health of ligaments, skin, tendons, and blood vessels. It’s necessary to heal wounds and to repair and maintain bones and teeth. When you don’t get enough vitamin C, these functions stop. Your gums start to bleed, wounds don’t heal, and severe joint pain develops.

At the same time, moderation is also key. When it comes to vitamins, too much can be just as bad as too little.

Vitamins are like Goldilocks and the three bears: too little can lead to deficiency disease, too much can cause imbalances or health problems, and the correct amount is just right.

The best way to get the vitamins you need is by choosing nutrient-dense foods. Eat vegetables, fruit, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat milk and yogurt, and a variety of lean protein foods. A nutrient-poor diet that is high in processed foods contains too few vitamins, and a vitamin supplement is not a substitute for a healthful diet.

Here is a handy poster that shows all of the food sources of vitamins. It is an excellent tool to explain the science of vitamins and minerals and how a healthful diet supplies all you need!

By Lynn Grieger RDN, CDE, CPT, CWC

9.99 Poster for September

Since September is traditionally a “back to school” month, we are bringing you two dynamic educational posters for our 9.99 poster special for September. 

The Exercise Poster really shows the value of movement and exercise for maintaining a healthy weigh. It explains the differences in calories burned when you move more. For example, if you are just sitting and watching TV you burn only half as many calories as you do when you are performing light chores around the house or walking. 

The second poster, Feel Full on Fewer Calories, shows the value of choose high-fiber, nutrient-dense foods as opposed to the ones that are calorie dense and devoid of fiber and nutrients. It uses a handy stop light to show the “go” foods that are high in fiber and other nutrients while also being low in calories. Vegetables, fruits, skim milk, cooked whole grains, lean protein, and beans are on this list. 

The 9.99 poster special is popular with our budget minded customers who want to decorate their walls with colorful and educational posters. These two posters are only available for the month of September. 

Check out our new posters here:

 

Get A Plant Slant

The Plant Slant Poster is new! The idea is to show the benefits of a more plant-based diet so everyone can think about how their diet can help them achieve a more optimal health status. You do not have to be on a diet or be vegetarian or vegan to slant your eating towards plants!

And plans benefit 9 different health points from vision to digestion to weight control to the avoidance of chronic diseases. 

 

This colorful poster proclaims the benefits of eating a plant-based dietary pattern with MORE vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds and LESS animal-based and processed foods. According to the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, this eating pattern is more health promoting and has a lower impact on the environment.

The image of two positive, active bodies made up of brightly colored plant foods catches the eye. Just a quick glance at the poster shows how a plant-based eating pattern is better for the whole body (bones, brain, heart, eyes, digestive system) and influences body weight and the risk for chronic diseases like heart disease, certain cancers, and diabetes.

The vibrant graphics encourage individuals to linger long enough to read that eating more plant-based foods is better for the environment. From vegans to lactovegetarians and flexitarians, there are different ways to enjoy a plant-based eating pattern.

 Lessons from The Plant Slant poster:

  • A dietary pattern that is higher in plant-based foods and lower in animal-based and processed foods promotes the health of your whole body.
  • Plant-based foods include vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds.
  • Eating a plant-based diet supports sustainability of the environment.
  • The definition of a plant-based eating pattern is broad. You can choose to include some animal-based foods (flexitarian and lactovegetarian) or avoid them altogether (vegan).

Check out our entire plant slant promotion collection!

 

 

I Am – New Poster for Diet and Lifestyle Motivation

The Nutrition Education Store has a new poster! The “I Am” poster is supportive and includes great messages about staying on track and not giving up.

This motivational health poster emphasizes the steps on your journey to a life of health and well-being. Affirmations serve as gentle reminders for self-care (sleeping enough, forgiving a setback), diet (eating mindfully when hungry, loving fruits & veggies), physical activity (moving more, exercising consistently), attitude (not giving up), and intention (planning and working to success).

These key phrases call out to people, encouraging them to slow down and read the poster. They recognize which steps they’ve taken and which ones may need more attention. Above all, they’ll realize that “I Am” in charge of taking these steps to the life I want to live.

Lessons from the I Am poster:

  1. Your journey to a healthier life takes planning and work, and starts with one step.
  2. Success comes from taking care of yourself, being kind to yourself, and not giving up.
  3. Physical activity means getting into the habit of moving more.
  4. Eating well means eating mindfully and learning to love healthy foods.
  5. Be mindful
  6. Encouragement and motivation
  7. One step starts a great journey
  8. Don’t give up
  9. Be consistent
  10. Empowering

Target population: In English, for general audiences, ages 12 – 100

Great for the classroom, gym, office, health fair, hallway, employee break room and more!

This poster is great for supporting all employees, clients, students, and patients on their journey to better health. It is part of a new diet and lifestyle motivational poster collection.

Compartment Plates Help Kids Eat More Fruits and Veggies

A recent study in a Colorado preschool found that providing children’s plates with compartments with images of fruits and veggies increased how much they added to their plate and consequently, consumed.
The study included 325 children. For three days during lunchtime in one week, kids were given plates with pictures of fruits and vegetables. Observations were done to see how much they added to their plates and ate. Those days were then compared to three days in a prior week with their normal plain white plates. 1

According to the study, kids served themselves about 44 grams of vegetables each day using the experimental plates, in comparison to 30 grams using their regular plates. In addition, they consumed more veggies: an average of 28 grams using experimental plates versus 21 grams with regular white plates.1

Using experimental plates, kids served themselves approximately 64 grams of fruit, an increase from about 60 grams previously. They ate an average of 55 grams of fruit using experimental plates compared to 51 grams previously.1


Emily Melnick, the study’s co-author from the University of Colorado states, “Pictures on lunch plates may indicate a social norm of vegetable and fruit consumption to nudge children’s dietary behaviors in a classroom setting. These pictures suggest that other children take fruits and vegetables from classroom serving bowls and place them in those compartments and that they should do the same,”.1


Melnick believes the kids in the experiment, similar to children in several preschool classrooms, ate family style meals as this type of dining behavior can encourage children to regulate their food intake, feel in control regarding food choices, learn about food and recognize hunger levels.1
Prior to the study, researchers weighed how much fruit and vegetables kids served themselves using regular white plates over the course of three days. A five-minute presentation was provided by the researchers to the children for the experiment week explaining the new plates with images showing compartments for fruits and vegetables at the start of the week. Children were provided the same meals before the study, and researchers repeated weighing how much children gave themselves and consumed.1


Although kids increased both the amount of fruits and vegetables they served themselves and ate, the difference in fruit intake was too small to rule out the possibility of it being due to chance. Children were eating more fruit than vegetables to start with, the researchers noted in their JAMA Pediatrics article. Children took close to 89% of available fruits versus 65% of available vegetables.1 In children, fruit intake has increased, though fruit and vegetable intake remain too low, according to the CDC. 2


Vandana Sheth, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and dietitian in private practice notes it’s not clear if the classroom experiment could be repeated at home. She states, “If this is repeatable at home, it can be a simple technique practiced by families and have a significant impact on their long-term health. “We know that early childhood dietary behaviors can affect their food choices and eating decisions into adulthood and have a long-term effect,” Sheth added. “If something as simple as putting pictures on plates to encourage food choice and amount can work, it’s worth a try.” Sheth was not involved in the study.1


If you need help getting your kids, other family members or clients to eat more produce, check out Food and Health’s variety of My Plate Plates: https://nutritioneducationstore.com/collections/myplate-plates


References:


1. https://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpao/division-information/media-tools/dpk/vs-fruits-vegetables/index.html

2. Li, Meng, Melnick, E Association of plate design with consumption of fruits and vegetables among preschool children. JAMA Pediatr. Published online August 6, 2018. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2018.1915

Submitted by Lisa Andrews, MEd, RD, LD

Who needs humor? Everyone!

We have a new category in our poster library: Health and Humor. We have collected our most fun and funny posters and included them in one collection for you to see. Here are just a few:

Research suggests that humor produces psychological and physiological benefits that help students learn.

Zak Stambor, Monitor, American Psychological Association
June 2006, Vol 37, No. 6, Print version: page 62

There are 12 different posters in this gallery. Imagine the delight when your staff, clients, patients, or students read about a “see-food diet” or try to outrun their fork (our newest poster)! They will stop reading their phones and start talking to each other. And they might remember some of your important lessons!

Here is a fun handout you can use now – it is about putting on your eating lights. 

Are You Drinking Candy?

One of our most popular posters just got a new art update! 

Most people would never imagine that a beverage could contain as much sugar as several pieces of candy. And they would swear they never eat that much candy! But one large glass of sweetened ice tea or a large coffee drink can contain even more sugar than a soda and 15 lollipop equivalents of sugar. We updated this classic poster to have a new graphic twist and to use the common beverages found in many stores and restaurants.

1 tsp of sugar contains about 4 grams of sugar or the equivalent of sugar found in a small lollipop. 

The bottom of the poster contains better choices for beverages like water or unsweetened iced tea. The “lollipop scale” is ready to show them how many lollipops are in the big sweetened drink deals sold in stores and restaurants. 

The 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends limiting added sugars to no more than 10 percent of daily calorie needs. That’s about 12 teaspoons (48 grams of added sugar) on a 2,000-calorie diet. But for kids — especially little kids, who may only need 1,200 to 1,400 calories per day — it’s even less.

This popular laminated poster is now in the healthy beverage health fair theme and it comes in two different banner sizes: 48×36″ or 24×62″ on a stand. It would go well with our “sugar math” poster. 

18″ x 24″ Laminated Poster: Are You Drinking Candy?
48″ x 36″ vinyl Health Fair Banner: Are You Drinking Candy?
24″ x 62″ Vinyl Banner With X Stand: Are You Drinking Candy?

View the entire Beverage Education Health Fair theme items here.

And here is a great handout about how to make infused water for more flavor and zero calories. Download and use now. 

Easy Health Fair and Nutrition Presentation Theme Chooser Introduced By Nutrition Education Store

Nutrition Education Store has launched a “Theme Chooser” in the online store navigation. The theme chooser allows customers to view health fair and nutrition education materials by theme. 

The theme chooser makes it easy to choose the perfect theme by topic and then have an entire display or presentation that matches with exciting, professionally designed graphics.

Almost 30 different themes with spectacular, people-pleasing graphics, exclusively designed by Nutrition Education Store, are currently presented and they include:

  1. 10K Steps
  2. Beverage Better
  3. Biometrics
  4. Change It Up
  5. Make A Rainbow Salad
  6. Colors of Health
  7. Diabetes Awareness
  8. Eat to Excel With PhytoMan
  9. Farm to School
  10. Farm to Table
  11. Fiber Math
  12. Food Label Education
  13. Freedom from Disease
  14. Groove to Move
  15. Healthier Choices 123
  16. Healthy Fork
  17. I Love Salad
  18. Kids and Physical Activity
  19. Math of Movement
  20. MyPlate
  21. Muscle Versus Fat
  22. New Blood Pressure Guidelines
  23. Nutrition Month
  24. Orange Coins: Diet and Exercise
  25. Portion Control
  26. Rainbow Chard Be Brighter Every Day
  27. Rainbow Salad
  28. Real Food Grows
  29. Whole Grain

If you need help choosing the best theme for your event you can always click the contact us link at the bottom of the page or call us toll free at 800-462-2352.

9.99 poster for August

We are happy to announce the 9.99 poster for August. The title is, Bring the Farm to Your Table. And the message is very simple. Eat more fruits and veggies and wholesome foods from the farm.

Pictured here on the poster are fresh beets, carrots, yams, rainbow chard, and asparagus.

We got a nice compliment on the Farm to Table themed materials so we are giving you a THANKYOU10 code for the rest of the materials that match the poster. The code is good through the month of August and it will also work on that poster so you will get another .99 off!

 

 

 

July 9.99 poster is here

For the month of July we have a surprise! We wanted to promote healthier breakfast habits along with fruits and vegetables. So these three posters will help you do that while staying on budget.
Plus here is our all time favorite handout set for fruit dessert recipes and a “substitute fruit for your favorite sweet” handout: