Water Poster Is Here

When we wanted to create a poster about water we defined the art style first. It had to be simple yet enticingly beautiful. Water is one of the greatest resources and our bodies are made mostly of water. By choosing water over the other sweetened beverages individuals can really dig in on a path of better health.

Plus the poster had to have a scientific infographic format.

So we sketched up the data and the specs and gave it to our best graphic artist. When he came back with this one I knew we had a winner.

Here is a visual tour with a list of the lessons:

The title is so gorgeous it makes water look better than soda, at least on paper!

You need 9 cups a day because your body uses water for many important functions! Now we are giving them a reason to do more of something instead of less!

And your body is comprised of 60% water!

Water is found in many beverages but be careful of added sugars:

Every system in your body uses water!

The water poster is ready to go in the NutritionEducationStore.com now – along with many other items that will match such as stickers, bookmarks, banners, and wristbands.

9.99 Poster Category

The 9.99 poster feature for each month has been very popular. We always regret when we have to say no to the numerous requests that we get to ship free items. We always wish we could say yes. 

The 9.99 poster program has been instilled to provide a quality education item to a program for minimal cost. Shipping is always free! We planned a new category so you can have a choice of these posters and we will change them up each month. This batch was featured in our latest catalog!

 

12 Hot Topics for 2019

Here is a list of the hottest nutrition and food teaching topics from the past few months. 

As much as people want a magic bullet for their health, teachers want a magic topic. Whenever there is a new list of Dietary Guidelines, a new regulation, or new news there is a hot topic. Right now the emerging hot topic is back to the basics. With nutrition there are always plenty of basics and people love to review and learn them!  The 2019 Nutrition Month theme is now all about reviewing the benefits of nutrition versus having a catchy theme.

Here are the hottest topics based on our expert writers’ recommendations, research in the news, views for blog posts, telephone and email inquiries with customers and readers, Amazon book sales, and over 500 blogs that we follow.

We thought we would share the current and predicted hot topic list so you can plan ahead for 2019.

  1. Kitchen How-To Cooking Demos for Seasonal Items – this is always our most popular topic and the how-to section in Amazon Cookbooks reflects that people want science, everyday cooking, more science, family recipes, and “low-calorie, high-flavor taste”
  2. Benefits of Family Meals and using MyPlate plates to help kids eat more fruits and veggies
  3. Plant Based Diet Basics: How to Plan Meals, New Foods, Benefits
  4. Ethnic Food Discoveries: Asian is HOT! Vietnamese, Indian, Afghanistan, Korean, Japanese, Chinese, Thai, and more! We see more ethnic foods in all grocery stores and the National Restaurant Association reports that global is the hottest and most consistent trend to date.
  5. Sugar: How to Find It, How to Consume Less
  6. Meal Planning Skill Building: Go interactive with your audience!
  7. Tests and Quizzes: What Do We Know? What Did We Learn? Quizzes, puzzles, and tests are consistently popular.
  8. Dietary Guidelines: They are so big and chocked full of information, find a page and review the lessons while waiting for 2020’s update. All of our posts regarding the guidelines are always very popular. 
  9. Fiber and Nutrient Density: a great combo lesson and way for consumers to understand nutrient quality plus fiber and gut health are always popular. One dietitian author of F-Factor has had great success using fiber education to help people lose weight.
  10. Weight Loss – a recent CDC survey found that half of all adults over the age of 20 have tried to lose weight over the past year and two thirds of all adults in the US are still overweight or obese. 
  11. Self Control – for better habits and weight loss success – October 2018 study and there are numerous studies on sleep and weight control
  12. How Do We Define Healthy Food? Comfort Food! This is according to one foodservice director and health educator making a difference in K-12 cafeterias. It is a more positive term and strategy for kids than health food or whole food. More examples of positive terms along these lines are real foods, slow foods, and local foods. 

All of these and more are in the new theme finder!

Fiber and Nutrient Density

The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans has a great definition for nutrient dense foods, which is emphasized as a “term to know.”

Nutrient Dense—A characteristic of foods and beverages that provide vitamins, minerals, and other substances that contribute to adequate nutrient intakes or may have positive health effects, with little or no solid fats and added sugars, refined starches, and sodium. Ideally, these foods and beverages also are in forms that retain naturally occurring components, such as dietary fiber. All vegetables, fruits, whole grains, seafood, eggs, beans and peas, unsalted nuts and seeds, fat-free and low-fat dairy products, and lean meats and poultry—when prepared with little or no added solid fats, sugars, refined starches, and sodium—are nutrient-dense foods. These foods contribute to meeting food group recommendations within calorie and sodium limits. The term “nutrient dense” indicates the nutrients and other beneficial substances in a food have not been “diluted” by the addition of calories from added solid fats, sugars, or refined starches, or by the solid fats naturally present in the food.

By focusing on whole, unprocessed foods that are good sources of fiber, such as beans, fruits, vegetables, nuts, and seeds, you are most likely to choose more nutrient dense foods and increase the quality of your eating plan. Fiber is one of the nutrients that is both underconsumed and a public health concern.

Low intakes of dietary fiber, according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, are due to low intakes of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains. Many refined grains are stripped of their fiber. 

Dietary fiber consists of nondigestible carbohydrates and lignin that are intrinsic and intact in plants. Most adults should get between 25 and 30 grams of fiber daily for females and males, respectively. The guideline is 14 grams per 1000 calories per day. 

Here are resources for you to help individuals find more fiber:

Here is a chart from the Dietary Guidelines for food sources of fiber.

Here are resources from our store:

Here is a handy handout on “finding” fiber and how to make little changes to get enough.

9.99 Poster for October

It’s here! The 9.99 special poster for October has arrived. 

This month’s featured poster is all about breakfast. 

This positive and colorful 18″ X 24″ poster encourages your clients, students, and employees to start each day with a healthful breakfast!

Start Your Day with Breakfast shares simple and memorable tips about the benefits for eating a healthful breakfast that in turn will help your audience make nutritious choices on their road to building a balanced eating pattern. A healthful, high-fiber breakfast can often add 8 or more grams of fiber to someone’s day.

This poster is great for school cafeterias that serve breakfast and it is also good for breakfast in the classroom programs.

And it can be great for an employee break room so that everyone fuels up and works strong!

This poster is a great resource for a 3- to 12- month worksite wellness/weight management incentive program where you can teach a new, timely weight management lesson/skill each month (or week). This topic supports the messages in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and MyPlate. 

This poster also comes with an informative handout that highlights the latest scientific research about the benefits of breakfast for both kids and adults. You can use this poster and handout as part of a compelling display, presentation, game, or activity. 

Here is a High Fiber Breakfast Handout you can download and use now. 

 
And here are all of our breakfast promotion items:
 

Nutrition Basic Pre and Post Test for Classes

Basic nutrition pre/post-test

  1. A healthy, balanced diet includes these three major nutrients (macronutrients):
    a. calories, fat, carbohydrate
    b. carbohydrate, protein, fat
    c. protein, fiber, fat
    d. calories, water, fiber
    e. I don’t know
  2. Which foods provide more of the essential nutrients that we’re often lacking?
    a. fruit, vegetables, and protein shakes
    b. seafood, whole grains, and gluten-free foods
    c. fruit, vegetables, whole grains and seafood
    d. I don’t know
  3. Bread, cereal, fruit and vegetables are the best source of which important nutrient?
    a. protein
    b. fat
    c. carbohydrate
    d. water
    e. I don’t know
  4. Chicken, legumes (dried beans and peas), fish, soy foods and eggs are a good source of which nutrient?
    a. protein
    b. fat
    c. carbohydrate
    d. water
    e. I don’t know
  5. Which foods are part of the dairy group?
    a. milk, eggs and cheese
    b. milk, cheese and yogurt
    c. soy milk, eggs and cheese
    d. I don’t know
  6. Use these plate proportions for healthy meal planning:
    a. ½ protein, ½ vegetables
    b. 1/3 protein, 1/3 vegetables, 1/3 fruit
    c. ½ vegetables and fruit, ¼ protein, ¼ whole grains
    d. I don’t know
  7. Which nutrient has the most calories per gram of weight?
    a. carbohydrate
    b. protein
    c. fiber
    d. fat
    e. I don’t know
  8. Which type of fat helps promote a healthy heart and cardiovascular system?
    a. saturated
    b. trans
    c. mono-unsaturated
    d. partially hydrogenated
    e. I don’t know
  9. Healthier types of fat are typically:
    a. liquid at room temperature
    b. solid at room temperature
    c. I don’t know
  10. Which food components provide little nutritional value and can be harmful when we eat too much?
    a. salt, sugar, saturated fat
    b. sugar, cholesterol, whole grains
    c. salt, cholesterol, fiber
    d. I don’t know
  11. Which of the following are sugar-sweetened beverages that provide little to no nutritional value?
    a. 100% fruit juice
    b. 100% vegetable juice
    c. fruit juice drinks
    d. I don’t know
  12. Which type of grain is the healthiest and contains the most natural nutrients?
    a. enriched grains
    b. refined grains
    c. multi-grains
    d. whole grains
    e. I don’t know
  13. What percentage of our grain intake (bread, cereal, rice, pasta, crackers) should be whole grains to support overall good health?
    a. 25%
    b. 50%
    c. 75%
    d. 100%
    e. I don’t know

Resources:

Dietary Guidelines for Americans. http://www.health.gov/

Choose My Plate. USDA. http://www.choosemyplate.gov

What Are Minerals?

We don’t eat rocks or dirt, but did you know that they are actually an important part of the food chain? Minerals in the earth are absorbed by water and plants, and then we absorb those same minerals when we eat plants or drink water. We also get minerals when we eat or drink foods that come from animals that consumed the mineral-rich plants and water.

Minerals are micronutrients. There are 15 different minerals that can be divided into two primary groups. You need rather large amounts of macrominerals like calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, and sulfur.

Trace minerals are needed in smaller amounts. These include include iron, manganese, copper, iodine, zinc, cobalt, fluoride, selenium, and molybdenum. All minerals are essential to good health, and just because we need smaller amounts of trace minerals doesn’t mean they’re any less important.

What Do Minerals Do?

Minerals work in our bodies in two ways. Many minerals support cells and structures in the same way that nails and screws support the walls of your house. For example, calcium and phosphorus help build bones, and iron is an essential part of red blood cells. Minerals also help regulate many body processes. For example, sodium and potassium are important to the nervous system and selenium works with vitamin E as an antioxidant, preventing cell damage.

Minerals in Food

Some minerals are easier to absorb from animal foods than plant foods. This means that vegetarians need to consume larger amounts of plant foods for optimum mineral intake. Minerals are generally unchanged by cooking, canning, and freezing. However, processing foods can remove key minerals from the equation.

Balancing Minerals

Balancing minerals well promotes overall health. Getting too little of some minerals can lead to deficiencies like anemia, weak bones, or impaired thyroid function. Getting too much of some minerals can lead to imbalances or even cause health problems. Excessive mineral intake usually comes from supplements. A mineral supplement is not a substitute for a healthy diet, and you should only take supplements if they have been recommended by your physician for specific health concerns.

The best way to get the minerals you need is by choosing nutrient-dense foods. Eat vegetables, fruit, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat milk and yogurt, and a variety of lean protein foods. A nutrient-poor diet that is high in processed foods contains too few vitamins, and a vitamin supplement is not a substitute for a healthful diet.

Here is a handy poster that shows all of the food sources of vitamins. It is an excellent tool to explain the science of vitamins and minerals and how a healthful diet supplies all you need!

By Lynn Grieger RDN, CDE, CPT, CWC

What Are Vitamins?

There are 13 different vitamins, and they’re vital micronutrients. You can divide them into two groups: fat-soluble and water-soluble.

Vitamins A, D, E and K are all fat-soluble. They require fat to be absorbed, and they are stored for a long time in your liver and body fat.

The rest are water-soluble vitamins, which travel more readily through the bloodstream. You pee out the ones that you don’t use quickly.

Vitamins are necessary for every function in your body. Your heart needs them to beat, your lungs need them in order to expand and contract, etc. If specific vitamins aren’t present in large enough quantities, these vital functions are adversely affected or even stop.

Think of your body as a house that needs constant, ongoing maintenance. The walls, foundation, and roof of the house are the macronutrients that provide the structure. Vitamins are the individual nails that hold everything together, the grout that keeps the floor tiles in place, and the paint that protects the walls. When you run out of nails, the house falls apart. When the grout crumbles and isn’t repaired, the floor tiles separate, and when paint chips and flakes, the walls are more likely to decay.

When your body runs out of a specific vitamin, it can’t function correctly. For example, vitamin C plays a vital role in maintaining the health of ligaments, skin, tendons, and blood vessels. It’s necessary to heal wounds and to repair and maintain bones and teeth. When you don’t get enough vitamin C, these functions stop. Your gums start to bleed, wounds don’t heal, and severe joint pain develops.

At the same time, moderation is also key. When it comes to vitamins, too much can be just as bad as too little.

Vitamins are like Goldilocks and the three bears: too little can lead to deficiency disease, too much can cause imbalances or health problems, and the correct amount is just right.

The best way to get the vitamins you need is by choosing nutrient-dense foods. Eat vegetables, fruit, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat milk and yogurt, and a variety of lean protein foods. A nutrient-poor diet that is high in processed foods contains too few vitamins, and a vitamin supplement is not a substitute for a healthful diet.

Here is a handy poster that shows all of the food sources of vitamins. It is an excellent tool to explain the science of vitamins and minerals and how a healthful diet supplies all you need!

By Lynn Grieger RDN, CDE, CPT, CWC

9.99 Poster for September

Since September is traditionally a “back to school” month, we are bringing you two dynamic educational posters for our 9.99 poster special for September. 

The Exercise Poster really shows the value of movement and exercise for maintaining a healthy weigh. It explains the differences in calories burned when you move more. For example, if you are just sitting and watching TV you burn only half as many calories as you do when you are performing light chores around the house or walking. 

The second poster, Feel Full on Fewer Calories, shows the value of choose high-fiber, nutrient-dense foods as opposed to the ones that are calorie dense and devoid of fiber and nutrients. It uses a handy stop light to show the “go” foods that are high in fiber and other nutrients while also being low in calories. Vegetables, fruits, skim milk, cooked whole grains, lean protein, and beans are on this list. 

The 9.99 poster special is popular with our budget minded customers who want to decorate their walls with colorful and educational posters. These two posters are only available for the month of September. 

Check out our new posters here:

 

Get A Plant Slant

The Plant Slant Poster is new! The idea is to show the benefits of a more plant-based diet so everyone can think about how their diet can help them achieve a more optimal health status. You do not have to be on a diet or be vegetarian or vegan to slant your eating towards plants!

And plans benefit 9 different health points from vision to digestion to weight control to the avoidance of chronic diseases. 

 

This colorful poster proclaims the benefits of eating a plant-based dietary pattern with MORE vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds and LESS animal-based and processed foods. According to the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, this eating pattern is more health promoting and has a lower impact on the environment.

The image of two positive, active bodies made up of brightly colored plant foods catches the eye. Just a quick glance at the poster shows how a plant-based eating pattern is better for the whole body (bones, brain, heart, eyes, digestive system) and influences body weight and the risk for chronic diseases like heart disease, certain cancers, and diabetes.

The vibrant graphics encourage individuals to linger long enough to read that eating more plant-based foods is better for the environment. From vegans to lactovegetarians and flexitarians, there are different ways to enjoy a plant-based eating pattern.

 Lessons from The Plant Slant poster:

  • A dietary pattern that is higher in plant-based foods and lower in animal-based and processed foods promotes the health of your whole body.
  • Plant-based foods include vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds.
  • Eating a plant-based diet supports sustainability of the environment.
  • The definition of a plant-based eating pattern is broad. You can choose to include some animal-based foods (flexitarian and lactovegetarian) or avoid them altogether (vegan).

Check out our entire plant slant promotion collection!